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Lions                   Gryphons          Dragons   and   Stags

Choice of Houses in 1955:

Recollected by:

Dragons

Gryphons

Lions

Stags

Graham Chapman

Croyland School

Victoria School

Finedon/

Irthlingborough

Rushden area

Dick Frost

Croyland Park & Wollaston

Victoria School

Higham, Ringstead

Rushden & Earls Barton

 Wellingborough boys who went to Croyland Park juniors wound up in the Dragons, along with the Wollaston outliers (N.B. I got it wrong, joined the Stags by mistake and was never allowed to forget it).  There were of course exceptions. I seem to remember that my old deceased mate Herbie Catlin from Higham was a Dragon, and there must have been others.  (Dick Frost, 1955).  There were, the two Tall brothers, both from Victoria, joined the Dragons - nobody ever told them the 'rule'!!! (Graham Tall, 1955)

On discovering the above I wrote to the 1955 reunion committee, commenting that 'it appeared the odds and sods joined the Lions.'  The response obtained was as follows:

Does that make me an 'odd' a 'sod' or just an 'odd sod'  ? David - a Lion from Finedon.  
P.S. Lions were in fact predominantly Finedon and Irthlingborough, were a pretty poor team during my years  at WGS  
( I blame Irthlingborough ) and won nothing except the Music Cup in year 1. Even then I think one of you still insists we
 shouldn't have.   At least we Lions learned how to lose graciously.   David Spencer (1955) 

As a fellow lion I always took satisfaction that they used us on eggs, doesn't that make us good eggs ? Well this odd sod will keep on roaring good or bad.   Bebe & Ben ( There I go showing my age again ! ) I hope this isnít too subtle for some of you youngsters    Roy Pettit (1955)

What else?

Drama Competitions:                   School Plays
Two plays stand out in my mind - a story entitled "The Old Bull" which is the story of a will and two brothers.  The older brother is the trustee to his father's estate and has the duty of dividing it up fairly into two halves. The younger brother can then choose which half of the estate he prefers, the estate has a large farm/farmhouse and a small one, it also has a prize winning bull.  The play ends with the immortal line "The old bull's daid"

                                                -  and a play about a sinking submarine.   Graham Tall (1955)
Stage Scenery - House Play - the Old Bull ??   Neil Sinclair

Cutting of House Plays in 1963