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Died after Korean War: Raymond-Kimber Leslie Walters

 

RICHARD SAXBY MUTIMER,  D.F.M., born 9.7.1920, entered the School in May 1932.  In July 1936 he joined the Staff of Wagon Repairs Ltd., Wellingborough. 

In 1937 he began regular service in the RAF and became Sgt. Navigator of a Sunderland.  He later served in Bomber Command, and whilst stationed at Malta he was praised by his Commanding Officer for his magnificent fighting spirit.  He was killed while flying over Malta August 1941, and in February 1942 was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal.  

He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Mutimer, 25 Broadway, Wellingborough.  'In Memoriam' book

 

Awarded Stags House Colours in Rugby

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

69 Squadron:  Motto: With vigilance we serve    Badge: In front of an anchor, a telescope.

On 10 January 1941, No. 431 Flight was redesignated as  69 Squadron.   It was based at Luqa, Malta and carried out strategic reconnaissance missions mainly using Marylands until May 1942 when Spitfires began to carry out all reconnaissance missions. RAF Marylands were built by the USA   On 10 January 1941, No. 431 Flight was redesignated No. 69 Squadron - it carried out strategic reconnaissance missions mainly using Marylands until May 1942 when Spitfires began to carry them out.

 

5360

THE LONDON GAZETTE, 16 SEPTEMBER, 1941

 Air Ministry 16th September, 1941.

 ROYAL  AIR FORCE.

 The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the following awards in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in flying operations against the enemy:

.

Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

550958 Sergeant Campbell CLARK , No. 69 Squadron (deceased). 

581062 Sergeant Richard Saxby MUTIMER, No. 69 Squadron (deceased).  Sergeants Clark and Mutimer have displayed a high standard of ability throughout the 40 operational missions in which they have participated as wireless operator-air gunner and air observer respectively. Sergeant Clark showed great keenness to engage the enemy, using his guns with damaging effect, while Sergeant Mutimer always willingly co-operated with his pilot when the opportunity for offensive action occurred. They have damaged or destroyed three Italian flying boats and, in one machine gun attack on an enemy aerodrome, destroyed one enemy aircraft and damaged several.

 

Web sources only:

Flight Sergeant Campbell CLARK, 550958, Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, 69 Squadron. On 10th August 1941 his Maryland aircraft was on reconnaissance over Catania, but during the return flight to Malta the starboard engine failed, they arrived at Luqa but the aircraft crashed short of the runway. The pilot Flight Lieutenant P.R. Wylde was killed instantly as was the observer Sergeant R.S.Mutimer. Flight Sergeant Clark was taken to hospital severely injured, where he died the next day. He is buried in Imtarfa cemetery

 

Maryland AR739 which crashed 10Aug41. F/Lt P.R. WYLDE (Pilot) and Sgt R.S. MUTIMER (Obs) were killed in the crash and are buried in the Malta (Capuccini) Naval Cemetery. Death date of CLARK is 11th Aug. 1941 and he's buried in grave 2B.3.2 of the Imtarfa Military Cemetery.

 

Note change in Pilot's name below:
Flying Officer Roger Drew was Awarded The D.F.C Sgt Mutimer and Sgt Clark. observer,and Wireless-operated air Gunner in F/O Drew's crew receiving the Posthumous, awared of D.F.M . Sgt Mutimer,was killed on August 10th on returning from Sicily, Sgt Clark died the following day, on their return a signal was received saying that they were returning on one engine, that their starboard motor having failed. The Aircraft A.R 739 crashed short of the airodrome while making an approach, the Pilot A/F/Lt Wylde and Sgt Mutimer being killed instantly, Sgt Clark received burns and severe concussion and was taken to Hospital, where he died the following Morning.
On my last visit to Kew I was able to find the Citation For Clark,and Mutimer D.F.M. which seem's to have been heavily censored, from their Citation in the London Gazette.
I have alway's believed that Sgt Clark, although in the RAF, was from a Commonwealth Country.

Google Search:    Marylands "Sergeant Campbell CLARK"

website.lineone.net/~remosliema/airmen191570.htm

website.lineone.net/~remosliema/airman1915702.htm

http://www.rafcommands.com/rafcommandsbanner ...

www.rafcommands.com/cgi-bin/dcforum/dcboard.cgi?az=show_thread&om=503&forum=DCForumID6 - 44k -

http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:R4b97z9K-CcJ:www.rafcommands.com/cgi-bin/dcforum/dcboard.cgi%3Faz%3Dshow_thread%26om%3D503%26forum%3DDCForumID6+Marylands+%22Sergeant+Campbell+CLARK%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=3

 

 

Some citations read better than others but better judges than us have made the awards.

The distinction between crosses for officers and medals for other ranks is absolute nonsense and has now been discontinued.

Bravery is bravery whatever the rank.     John

 

Other Sources

London Gazette

16 September 1941

Distinguished Flying Medal

550958 Sergeant Campbell CLARK, No. 69 Squadron (deceased). 

581062 Sergeant Richard Saxby MUTIMER, No. 69 Squadron (deceased).

Sergeants Clark and Mutimer have displayed a high standard of ability throughout the 40 operational missions in which they have participated as wireless operator-air gunner and air observer respectively.  Sergeant Clark showed great keenness to engage the enemy, using his guns with damaging effect, while Sergeant Mutimer always willingly co-operated with his pilot when the opportunity for offensive action occurred. They have damaged or destroyed three Italian flying boats and, in one machine gun attack on an enemy aerodrome, destroyed one enemy aircraft and damaged several others.

 

69 Squadron

No. 69 Squadron was formed on 28 December 1916 at South Carlton. In September 1917 it moved to France as a corps reconnaissance unit and on 19 January 1918 was redesignated No. 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps.

On 10 January 1941, No. 431 Flight was redesignated No. 69 Squadron. Based in Malta, it carried out strategic reconnaissance missions mainly using Marylands until May 1942 when Spitfires began to carry out all reconnaissance missions. These were later supplemented by Baltimores for shipping reconnaissance and anti-submarine patrols until April 1944 when the Squadron returned to the UK. No. 69 re-assembled at Northolt on 5 May 1944 with Wellingtons for night reconnaissance duties beginning operations on the eve of D-Day. In September the Squadron moved to France and Belgium until 7 May 1945, the Squadron disbanding on 7 August 1945.

 

CWGC

Name:  

 MUTIMER, RICHARD SAXBY

Initials:  

 R S

Nationality:  

 United Kingdom

Rank:  

 Sergeant (Obs.)

Regiment/Service:  

 Royal Air Force

Unit Text:  

 69 Sqdn.

Age:  

 21

Date of Death:  

 10/08/1941

Service No:  

 581062

Awards:  

 D F M

Additional information:  

 son of Leonard and Dora May Mutimer, of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Prot. Sec. (Men's). Plot F. Grave 54.
Cemetery: MALTA (CAPUCCINI) NAVAL CEMETERY