In Memoriam  - Raymond George Osborne                                                                                 Home

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In Memoriam Book

What Happened to Men Below Intro WW2 et al
Arthur Ernest Abbott William John Berrill Peter (F.C.) Causebrook Harold Cheaseman
Gordon Roy Coe Jack Dunkley Gordon George Elderton Peter Gifford Felce

Frederick Furr

Harold Philip Gardiner

Anthony Robert Gillitt

Ronald Douglas Hales

Norman Leonard Hornsey

Robert Howard

Edwin Hudson John Arthur Paul Loake
Richard Saxby Mutimer Raymond Reginald Norman Raymond George Osborne Brian Terence Peck
Colin Roderick Penness Douglas Arthur Prigmore John Harry Sharp Norman Perkins Sharpe
Robert Troath Died after Korean War: Raymond-Kimber Leslie Walters

If you can help with his early flying career please contact me:  grahamtall@wgsmemories.org.uk

RAYMOND GEORGE OSBORNE, born 9.7.1922, entered the School in September 1933.  In July 1936, he left School to take up employment with the Wollaston Co-operative Society.  Later he joined the Staff of Messrs. Arthur Dawes, Wellingborough. 

In 1941 he joined the R.A.F. and trained for his Pilot’s Course in Canada and the United States later going to Africa for a course in navigation.  In 1944, when returning from operations over Southern Germany, his plane was brought down at Igelslack.  He is buried at the British Military Cemetery at Bad Toels, Durnbach, 28 miles from Munich. 

He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Osborne, 104 Mill Road, Wellingborough.  'In Memoriam' book

 

I have discovered no information on 1941-1943  If you can help please contact me on grahamtall@wgsmemories.org.uk

 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission identified Raymond's squadron as number 49 and the date of his death as the 26th/27th April.1944.  The 49th squadron's history recounts that the journey that night was a long distance raid on Schweinfurt:

Mosquitoes of 627 Squadron, Woodhall Spa, used 5 Group's low-level marking technique for the first time. The attempt was not accurate and much of the bombing fell outside Schweinfurt.   49 Squadron suffered the heavy loss of three crews this night: F/Lt Bob Armstrong DFC and crew were all killed and were buried alongside each other in the Durnbach War Cemetery in Germany.

 

Plane:  Lancaster ND687 (EA-)                              The Crew was on their 5th operation, all were killed
F/L R.G. Armstrong DFC        Pilot
Sgt D.E. Endean                      Flight Engineer

F/S R.G. Osborne                   Navigator

Sgt S.F. Foster                       Wireless Operator

Sgt D.J. Cooper                     Air Gunner

W/O L.T. Kennedy RCAF     Bomb Aimer

P/O T.H. Morris RCAF          Air Gunner   

http://www.bomberhistory.co.uk/49squadron/Roll%20of%20honour/Roll_A/Armstrong_R.html

Below:  An Avro Lancaster

 

The squadron's history can be found in the following book:   Beware of the Dog at war £25 plus £5 postage & packing in the UK  an account of  49 Squadron's operations       Source: http://www.bomberhistory.co.uk/49squadron/Main%20Menu.html

 

Bomber Command includes an interesting account of this long distance raid:

27/28 April 1944     

Friedrichshafen: 322 Lancasters and 1 Mosquito of Nos 1, 3, 6 and 8 Groups. This was a raid with some interesting aspects. The Air Ministry had urged Bomber Command to attack this relatively small town in moonlight because it contained important factories making engines and gearboxes for German tanks. But the flight to this target, deep in Southern Germany on a moonlit night, was potentially very dangerous; the disastrous attack on Nuremberg had taken place only 4 weeks previously in similar conditions. However, Friedrichshafen was further south and on the fringe of the German night-fighter defences; because of this and the various diversions which confused the German controllers, the bombers reached the target without being intercepted. However, the German fighters arrived at the target while the raid was taking place and 18 Lancasters were lost, 5.6 per cent of the force. 1,234 tons of bombs were dropped in an outstandingly successful attack based on good Pathfinder marking; Bomber Command later estimated that 99 acres of Friedrichshafen, 67 per cent of the town's built-up area, were devastated. Several factories were badly damaged and the tank gearbox factory was destroyed. When the American bombing survey team investigated this raid after the war, German officials said that this was the most damaging raid on tank production of the war.      Source: http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/apr44.html

 

Bomber Command Diary

http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/apr44.html

26/27 April 1944

493 aircraft - 342 Lancasters, 133 Halifaxes, 18 Mosquitos - from all groups except No 5 despatched to Essen. 7 aircraft - 6 Lancasters, 1 Halifax - lost, 1.4 per cent of the force. The Bomber Command report states that this was an accurate attack, based on good Pathfinder ground-marking.

206 Lancasters and 11 Mosquitos of No 5 Group and 9 Lancasters of No 1 Group to Schweinfurt. 21 Lancasters lost, 9.3 per cent of the force. This raid was a failure. The low-level marking provided for the first time by Mosquitos of No 627 Squadron was not accurate. Unexpectedly strong head winds delayed the Lancaster marker aircraft and the main force of bombers. German night fighters were carrying out fierce attacks throughout the period of the raid. The bombing was not accurate and much of it fell outside Schweinfurt.

A Victoria Cross was awarded after the war to Sergeant Norman Jackson, a flight engineer in a Lancaster of No 106 Squadron which was shot down near Schweinfurt. The Lancaster was hit by a German night fighter and a fire started in a fuel tank in the wing near the fuselage. Sergeant Jackson climbed out of a hatch with a fire extinguisher, with another crew member holding the rigging lines of Jackson's parachute which had opened in the aircraft. Sergeant Jackson lost the fire extinguisher and, as both he and his parachute rigging were being affected by the fire, the men in the aircraft let the parachute go. Sergeant Jackson survived, though with serious burns and a broken ankle received on landing with his partially burnt parachute. The remainder of the crew baled out soon afterwards.

217 aircraft - 183 Halifaxes, 20 Lancasters, 14 Mosquitos of Nos 4, 6 and 8 Groups to Villeneuve St Georges. 1 Halifax lost.

Support and 16 Mosquitos to Hamburg, 10 Stirlings to Chambly, 12 RCM sorties, 20 Serrate and 13 Intruder patrols, 16 Halifaxes and 6 Stirlings minelaying off the Dutch coast and in the Frisians, 10 aircraft on Resistance operations, 21 OTU flights. 1 Serrate Mosquito lost.

Total effort for the night: 1,060 sorties, 30 aircraft (2.8 per cent) lost.

27/28 April 1944

Friedrichshafen: 322 Lancasters and 1 Mosquito of Nos 1, 3, 6 and 8 Groups. This was a raid with some interesting aspects. The Air Ministry had urged Bomber Command to attack this relatively small town in moonlight because it contained important factories making engines and gearboxes for German tanks. But the flight to this target, deep in Southern Germany on a moonlit night, was potentially very dangerous; the disastrous attack on Nuremberg had taken place only 4 weeks previously in similar conditions. However, Friedrichshafen was further south and on the fringe of the German night-fighter defences; because of this and the various diversions which confused the German controllers, the bombers reached the target without being intercepted. However, the German fighters arrived at the target while the raid was taking place and 18 Lancasters were lost, 5.6 per cent of the force. 1,234 tons of bombs were dropped in an outstandingly successful attack based on good Pathfinder marking; Bomber Command later estimated that 99 acres of Friedrichshafen, 67 per cent of the town's built-up area, were devastated. Several factories were badly damaged and the tank gearbox factory was destroyed. When the American bombing survey team investigated this raid after the war, German officials said that this was the most damaging raid on tank production of the war.

223 aircraft - 191 Halifaxes, 16 Lancasters, 16 Mosquitos despatched to Aulnoye. 1 Halifax lost. Bombing was concentrated and much damage was caused to the railway yards.

144 aircraft - 120 Halifaxes, 16 Lancasters, 8 Mosquitos - to attack railway yards at Montzen on the Belgian-German border. The bombing force, particularly the second of the 2 waves, was intercepted by German fighters and 14 Halifaxes and 1 Lancaster were shot down. Only one part of the railway yards was hit by the bombing.The only Lancaster lost was that of Squadron Leader EM Blenkinsopp, a Canadian pilot of No 405 Squadron who was acting as Deputy Master Bomber. Blenkinsopp managed to team up with a Belgian Resistance group and remained with them until captured by the Germans in December 1944. He was taken to Hamburg to work as a forced labourer and later died in Belsen concentration camp 'of heart failure'. He has no known grave.

159 OTU aircraft on a diversionary sweep over the North Sea, 24 Mosquitos on diversion raid to Stuttgart, 11 RCM sorties, 19 Serrate and 6 Intruder patrols, 8 Halifaxes minelaying off Brest and Cherbourg, 44 aircraft on Resistance operations. 1 Serrate Mosquito lost.

Total effort for the night: 961 sorties, 35 aircraft (3.6 per cent) lost.

 

49 Squadron

Superb Source http://www.bomberhistory.co.uk/49squadron/Main%20Menu.html

Raids flown (WW2):

Hampdens 241 bombing, 82 minelaying, 19 leaflet
Manchesters 4 bombing, 2 minelaying, 4 leaflet
Lancasters 298 bombing, 21 minelaying, 3 leaflet

Sorties:    6501

Losses:
55 Hampdens
6 Manchesters
102 Lancasters

 

Motto “Beware of the Dog”

Squadron Codes used: -  

XU    Apr 1939 - Sep 1939

EA    Sep 1939 - Apr 1951

 

Early operations in WW2 consisted of minelaying, reconnaissance and leaflet dropping but following the German offensive in May 1940 it began bombing raids against German targets.

Operations with Hampdens continued apace until April 1942, when the squadron re-equipped with the Manchester.  However, by this time the failings of the Manchester were becoming obvious and in July they were replaced with Lancasters. The continued to operate for the rest of WW2 as part of Bomber Command's main Force and was retained as part of the post-war bomber force.     http://www.rafweb.org/Sqn046-50.htm

 

Handley Page Hampden   Sept 1938 - Apr 1942

Specifications:

Type: Four-seat medium bomber

Powerplant: Two 1,000 hp Bristol Pegasus XVII 9-cylinder radial piston engines

Performance: Maximum speed: 254 mph at 13,800 ft

Cruising speed: 167 mph

Service ceiling: 19,000 ft

Range: 1,885 miles with 2,000 lb of bombs

Weights: Empty: 11,780 lb

Maximum take-off: 18,756 lb

Dimensions: Span: 69 ft 2 in

Length: 53 ft 7 in

Height: 14 ft 11 in

Wing area: 668.0 sq ft

Armament: Two forward-firing 0.303 inch machine-guns, and twin installations of similar guns

in dorsal and ventral positions, plus up to 4,000 lb of bombs

Avro Manchester    April 1942 - Jun 1942

Avro Lancaster       Jun 1942 - Mar 1950

 

Below  http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/97/a2936397.shtml

I served as a wireless operator/air gunner with B flight 49 squadron at RAF Scampton from September 1941 to November 1942 on Hampdens, Manchesters and Lancasters.

About midday on 12th February 1942 we were ordered to an urgent briefing and take-off to lay mines in the path of the 3 German cruisers ( Scharnhorst, Prince Eugen and Gneisenau )who were sailing up the channel from Brest to Bremen under cover of bad weather - the channel dash,

As we scrambled in the flying clothing locker room getting kitted up, Flt.Sgt.Jack Gadsby DFM came in to tell me my detail was a scrubbed as our aircraft was unserviceable. Sgt Brian Hunter, a fellow wop/ag, was doing some cursing as he had left his flying boots back at his billet - incidentally against orders - and now prevailed upon me to lend him mine as I would not be needing them.

Brian hunter and his crew did not return nor did 3 other b flight crews.

John Wards` excellent history of 49 Squadron - beware of the dog at war - records on page 122 that Hampden p5324 pilot Sgt Downs came down in the sea but the cause not known. He was not found but the bodies of 3 crew, Sgts Poxon, Wood and Brian Hunter were recovered from a Dutch beach several days later.

My flying boots were clearly marked 1051928 Sgt W E Clarke on the upper rim but obviously Brian would be identified by his `dog tags`. Harry Moyles’ book `the Hampden file` records on page 118 that the 3 crew are buried at The Hague.

I reported the loss of my flying boots, and the circumstances,to my flight commander and the following day I was called in and given Brian Hunters` boots, in time for my next operation on 16th February, laying mines off Heligoland.

I wore Brian`s boots until the end of my flying duties and demobbed in November 1945

I still mourn Brian - and the 955 bomber crewmen of 49 Squadron

 

eware of the Dog at war £25 plus £5 postage & packing in the UK

 

CWGC

Name: 

OSBORNE, RAYMOND GEORGE

Initials:

R G

Nationality:

United Kingdom

Rank:

Flight Sergeant (Nav.)

Regiment/Service:

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

Unit Text:

49 Sqdn.

Age:

21

Date of Death:

27/04/1944

Service No:

1208875

Additional information:

Son of Walter and Elsie Kemming Osborne, of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire.

Casualty Type:

Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference:

Coll. grave 4. J. 12-14.

Cemetery:

DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY

The site for Durnbach War Cemetery was chosen, shortly after hostilities had ceased, by officers of the British Army and Air Force, in conjunction with officers of the American Occupation Forces in whose zone Durnbach lay. The great majority of those buried here are airmen shot down over Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Austria, Hessen and Thuringia, brought from their scattered graves by the Army Graves Service.